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Construction News

Construction News
Released:  03/07/20122012-07-03
Word count:  461

Dubai: A slowdown in real estate development in key global markets? Not too much of a concern if you are the president and CEO of Siemens and have all the infrastructure and energy projects to pitch for.

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Manoj Nair - Gulf News
“The Gulf states are among the fastest-growing economies in the world and have massive requirements as far as investment in infrastructure is concerned,” Loscher said.

“This means there is a constant flow of major infrastructure projects to the markets. These are supported by a mix of continuously strong crude oil prices and high production levels, which give regional governments the financial means to push forward with these investments.”

Siemens closed last year on an all-time profit high, and carried the momentum into the first quarter of its 2012 financial year.

But the second quarter was not as productive, even though revenues were up 9 per cent year-on-year.

“Orders [were] coming in below 2011 levels due to lower volumes from large orders,” said Loscher.

“The Middle East traditionally accounts for a large share of our overall order intake and also did so last year.”

This includes a $1 billion (Dh3.67 billion) plus deal for a power plant in Saudi Arabia and a $1.4 billion contract for the Shuweihat 3 power station in Abu Dhabi.

“Generally, we see opportunities in all of the countries of the Middle East as they all face similar challenges such as fast-growing populations and the need to create jobs,” Loscher added.

“As a general rule, the current situation will not reduce the demand for energy-efficient and resource-saving infrastructure solutions. We’ve rigorously focused our company on our core businesses, green technologies and the growth markets of the future.

“The same applies for the Middle East. In the region, there is a pressing need to accommodate rapidly growing populations.

“This, in turn, requires investments in infrastructure and industries across the region, and these developments far outweigh any drop in the real estate segment.”

According to industry sources, there has been a marked increase in new tendering activity in Saudi Arabia and Qatar, though it could be post-Ramadan before most of these are signed off and translate into work on the ground. Libya, in the throes of reconstruction, offers another area of opportunity.

A fact that is acknowledged by Loscher. “In light of the recent events in the country and the transition it is going through, we are committed to helping rebuild it,” the CEO said.

“We completed earlier this year a fast-track programme to restore full capacity at Misrata power plant and to repair the 400-kV Misrata substation to ensure uninterrupted electricity supplies to large parts of the population in the northwestern Libyan city. So we are already heavily involved and we see more opportunities opening up as reconstruction and the development of the economy continues to accelerate.

We have a large installed base in the country, which ensures ongoing engagement and involvement for us.” Having had an exposure to the region for more than 150 years, Siemens sure knows its way around.

[source: Gulf News]
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Construction News

Construction News
Released:  02/07/20122012-07-02
Word count:  185

The Egyptian Businessmen Institute (EBI) has started a series of meetings with Korean companies to implement projects in Libya worth 4.1 billion dollars.

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Mina Monir
The head of EBI Hussein Sabour is arranging conferences with the Seoul commercial office to encourage Egyptian companies to cooperate with the South Korean company WON on Contracts a number projects that could be co-implemented in Libyan.

WON has already cooperated with commerical companies in Egypt to build more than 2000 housing units worth 400 million dollars and had finished 60% of them before the project was brought to halt due to the revolution in Libya. The project is expected to be continued from September 2012, with the aid of Egyptian contracting companies.

Another major project is situated in Tubruq city and costs 1 billion dollars and includes building 5000 housing units. The project is expected to be undertaken by the start of 2013 and requires full cooperation between the Korean company and Egyptian companies to provide building tools, materials and a workforce. The Korean company WON has already built bridges with Egyptian, British, Turkish and Greek companies for carrying out further infrastructure projects.

Representatives of WON will visit Egypt in July 2012 to discuss the implementation of these projects and cooperation with the National Transitional Council of Libya to facilitate working needs.



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Construction News

Construction News
Released:  02/07/20122012-07-02
Word count:  131

It has been reported that the Libya Infrastructure and Construction Summit (LICS) will be hosted in the Turkish capital between 7th and 8th of November 2012.

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Mina Monir
This important event aims to provide businessmen and companies who are interested in rebuilding Libya with extensive networking opportunities with government members and the business leaders of the new Libya. The conference will provide a good space to discuss investment plans for forthcoming projects in Libya within the fields of infrastructure and construction, as well as uncovering potential trade and business opportunities.

The conference will cover the sectors of transport, energy and utilities, construction, urban development and communications. The summit is sponsored by DeTek which is based in Dusseldorf, Germany. De Tek has been providing professionals with vast experience in the oil and gas, mining and various other industries and in business. LICS will be organized by Oliver Kinross International Research Networks.

For more Information please visit: http://www.libyaconstruction2012.com/
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Business News

Business News
Released:  02/07/20122012-07-02

Libya is preparing to hold national elections in a week's time. The economy has been largely driven by its oil development, but trade through Libya's ports has grown in recent months. Misrata, in particular, has successfully operated without oversight from Tripoli and it could serve as a blueprint for economic development for rest of the country. Al Jazeera's Paul Brennan reports.

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Paul Brennan - Aljazeera English
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Business News

Business News
Released:  29/06/20122012-06-29
Word count:  1088

An improvised explosive device (IED) exploded outside the Tunisian embassy in Tripoli on 26 January, causing slight damage to the building's entrance gate, but no casualties. Armed units reportedly blocked the main highway linking Tripoli and major cities in the west of the country with Benghazi and the east. The security situation in Benghazi remains the same. The risk of further small-scale attacks targeting the assets and personnel of...

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Hind Bensari
Projections Tripoli will remain calm, although there is an ongoing risk of clashes between rival militia groups and small scale attacks on government buildings and the assets and personnel of foreign governments and international organisations.

This risk will remain most pronounced in Benghazi, where there are likely to be further attacks of a similar nature to those seen in recent months.

There is also a risk of protests and demonstrations in all major cities in the run up to elections, despite the relative lack of political activity witnessed so far. There will continue to be a risk of violence at these demonstrations, particularly those in Benghazi, where the issue of semi-autonomy has proved to be a divisive.

Tensions and clashes will continue in a number of flashpoint areas in the south of the country, particularly in the southeastern town of al-Kufra, the southwestern town of Sabha and a number of other locations in the West of the country to the south of the capital.

Election campaigning will likely gain pace over the coming week, although it is unlikely that enough publicity and enthusiasm will be generated to avoid some questioning over the legitimacy and representative nature of the results.

Tripoli An improvised explosive device (IED) exploded outside the Tunisian embassy in Tripoli on 26 January, causing slight damage to the building's entrance gate, but no casualties. Gunmen recently stormed the Tunisian consulate in Benghazi to protest against an exhibition in Tunis that they claimed was an insult to Islam, while other attacks on foreign diplomatic targets in Benghazi have been linked to Jihadist cells operating in the east of the country.

It remains unclear who carried out the attack, although it is likely to be linked to the same movement that was involved in the embassy attack. Tripoli itself has been largely spared the kind of low level attacks that have become more frequent in the east of the country, particularly Benghazi, however the recent attack demonstrates that hostile elements do have the capability to conduct attacks in the capital, albeit on a small-scale.

The recent series of attacks have all been small in scale, and there have been few major casualties. A rocket propelled grenade (RPG) attack targeting a UK FCO convoy injured two of those travelling on the convoy, although even this was likely an opportunist attack helped by the high profile nature of the convoy. Most of the attacks are likely aimed at sending a message that security cannot be guaranteed, thus harming the transition process, and the image of the security situation abroad.

Tripoli-Benghazi Highway Armed units reportedly blocked the main highway linking Tripoli and major cities in the west of the country with Benghazi and the east. The militias stated they would remain in place until the east of the country is given a greater distribution of seats in the new national parliament. The self-declared governing council of the east (known as the Barqa Council) is calling for a boycott of the elections unless seats are shared equally between the provinces.

The road block has not been opposed by government security forces, demonstrating the relative weakness of the central authorities in the face of an array of local and regional militia groups, many of which remain heavily armed.

Benghazi The security situation in Benghazi remains the same. The risk of further small-scale attacks targeting the assets and personnel of international organisations and the foreign diplomatic presence remains high, although casualty figures will likely remain low.

In the run up to elections there is a growing risk of protests and demonstrations calling for a boycott, or calling for unity and full participation in the polls. Previous demonstrations have seen clashes between members of opposing sides in this debate, and there is a risk of further low level violence of this nature. Protests will likely focus on government buildings and central squares of the city.

Oil Industry Operations at Ras Lanuf, Libya's largest oil refinery have been delayed further, and will not restart in early July as previously stated. A petrochemical unit at the facility, which does not run on crude oil, will however begin operations as planned. Ras Lanuf accounts for well over half of Libya's refining capacity at 220,000 bpd. Unconfirmed reports indicate that a dispute over the price at which the refinery is supplied with crude is holding up the return of operations.

Political Section With elections scheduled for 7 July fast approaching, there are growing concerns over the lack of political campaigning and publicity surrounding the polls, in a country where the majority have never voted, and a large proportion registered voters remain unclear over the process and what is required of them. There are growing fears that the results will lack legitimacy if large numbers of those registered, which accounts for around 80 per cent of the eligible population, choose not to turnout due to security concerns, or spoil their votes as they do not understand the process properly.

Moreover, with 120 seats in the new parliament designated to independents, and only 20 reserved for political parties, the result is likely to be a parliament with a lack of unity and vision over how to move forward, potentially resulting in stagnated decision making process and a lack of ability to tackle major issues and challenges. Add to this the potential for a low turnout and results that could be perceived as largely unrepresentative, and there is clearly potential for further frustration and tension in the aftermath of the polls.

The lawyer for former Gaddafi-era Prime Minister al-Baghdadi al-Mahmoudi stated on 26 June that his client had been badly beaten by Libyan security forces, which left him with broken ribs and a punctured lung. Libyan government officials denied the claims, branding them "a naked lie”. Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki had previously stated that the extradition of al-Mahmoudi from his country was illegal, and was carried out behind his back. Libyan officials stated that human rights had yet to visit al-Mahmoudi, but stated that in the near future full access would be given for any Tunisian entity wishing to visit him in Libya and check on his condition and treatment.

AKE is a leading international security risk-mitigation and analysis provider to international businesses, insurers, NGOs and news media. Founded in 1991 by Andrew Kain, AKE distinguishes itself from other security firms by taking a needs- and intelligence-led approach to assessing, monitoring, training for and protecting against risk. For security assistance on the situation in Libya please contact operations@akegroup.com or call +44 (0) 1432 267 111. For intelligence contact intel@akegroup.comfor further information.
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Construction News

Construction News
Released:  29/06/20122012-06-29
Word count:  210

The Voice of Russia reported that the Russian Railways company JSC is discussing with the Libyan authorities the possibility to resume the construction of its railroad project.

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Mina Monir
The JSC administration has decided to develop different projects in Eastern Europe, Africa and Gulf which led to resuming negotiations with Libyan authorities to resume the railway project. JSC’s project started the construction of the Sirte-Benghazi railway in 2008 before the revolution and the process was halted due to uprisings and their consequent violence. The project is the largest one undertaken by JSC and 100 Km of the roadway as well as 30 Km of the railroad has already been built. The company has completed five concrete batch plants,two of which have started production, as well as finishing 115 switches. The project contract includes the construction of a 500 Km long railroad connecting Benghazi with Sirte. RussianLibyan relations have experienced some difficulties after the Russian reluctance to condemn the former Gaddafi’s regime and recognize the National Transitional Council of the Libyan revolution. However, bridges of communication and reconciliation have been successfully built between the two countries and this is having a considerable impact on economic cooperation in the different sectors of energy, food and infrastructure. One of the important agreements was Libya’s decision to resume imports of wheat from Russia, as well as its approval of Russian firms to operate in Libya to rebuild the country’s infrastructure and oil industry.
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Dear Sir, Greetings from Al Manzel International. As a leading company dealing with recruitment of Pakistani staff Al Manzel International Pakistan provides professional manpower to the Construction, Oilfield, hospitality & Power plants industry. One of our main policies is not to charge recruiting fees and air ticket charges from the companies. We can guarantee to provide you with the best screened recruits as we selected through two rounds of per-interview by our company, before the selection by foreign company. As a leading company dealing with recruitment of Pakistani staff we are looking companies in Libyan market and encourage you to contact us, please feel free to contact us Best Regards with Respect, Azam Khan Managing Director Mob: +971-50-7613855 Abu Dhabi United Arab Emirates U.A.E. Al Manzel International (OEP) Overseas Employment Promoters PAKISTAN Tel: +92-62-2443847 Fax: +92-62-2441847 Mob: +92-342 7380847 (PAK) E mails: azam@almanzelint.com URL: www.almanzelint.com YOU THINK WE MAKE POSSIBLE

Anonymous
5 yearss ago

Business News

Business News
Released:  29/06/20122012-06-29
Word count:  228

BP Exploration Libya Ltd hereby requests “Expression of Interest” from qualifying Contractors for the provision of Technical Services Agreements in support of BP’s forthcoming exploration drilling campaign in the onshore and offshore blocks in Libya.

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National Oil Corporation
Any contractors providing “Expression of Interest” must as a minimum provide the following information: A) Copies of Libyan Company Registration Documents (Libyan Tax Registration/Libyan Company Registration/Libyan Permit to Work); B) Contractor’s nationality and details of their Registration C) Details of experience and results in provision of technical services and support services in Libya; and D) Details of Health, Safety and Environment Management programs in place. E) Details of technical personnel and support services that the Contractor can provide (including technical specifications). Contractors are now invited to register their interest for the provision of technical services and related support services for use in Libya with details as above. This information will then be used by BP Libya to identify potential contractors to participate in a rigorous pre-qualification exercise and competitive tender for this work.

Response Deadline and Address A statement of Expression of Interest and all required data must be received no later than the close of business on 30 June 2012.Interested contractors can submit the information via email as follows: Email address: BPLibyaContracts@bp.com The information can alternatively be submitted on CD to BP Libya, Abdelaziz Bin Omar Street, Noufleen, Tripoli – attention: PSCM Specialist/Maryam Bennaji

BP Exploration Libya Ltd reserves the right to exclude without notice Contractors providing insufficient or inadequate information. This announcement is to be considered as an Expression of Interest only
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Business News

Business News
Released:  29/06/20122012-06-29
Word count:  731

Punj Lloyd Ltd. (PUNJ), India’s third- largest engineering company, is counting on peace in war-torn Libya to help revive 17 percent of its orderbook and sustain profit for a second straight year as growth slows at home.

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Karthikeyan Sundaram - Bloomberg
The company, backed by Warburg Pincus LLC, plans to resume work next month in the North African nation where it has $800 million worth of projects, Chairman Atul Punj said. It aims to begin drilling in Sirte Basin for Waha Oil Co. starting July and resume construction of a road and upgrading a township in Tripoli after elections, Punj said.

Projects in Libya may help boost revenue by as much as $500 million in the year starting in April 2013, Punj said.

Overseas contracts may “soon” account for 80 percent of sales of the builder as the weakest pace of expansion in almost a decade in India prompts the company to look for more business abroad.

“This will be a big positive for the company and give a boost to the revenues,” said Nitin Arora, an analyst at Mumbai- based Angel Broking Ltd, who has a neutral rating on the stock. “Given the current scenario in India, they have to go overseas to improve their orderbook.”

Campaigning began this month for Libya’s first national parliamentary election after four decades of rule by dictator Muammar Qaddafi, who was toppled and killed by rebels in a violent uprising last year.

The conflict cost the nation billions of dollars in lost trade and revenue, the International Monetary Fund has said, while the Libyan government says the revolution killed 30,000 people and wounded 50,000.

‘Perfect Storm’

In February 2011, Punj Lloyd plunged in Mumbai trading after the chairman said projects in Libya may be disrupted because of the unrest. A month later, the company said it evacuated most of its employees from the country.

“It was a perfect storm,” Punj, 54, said in an interview at his headquarters in Gurgaon near New Delhi. “Now we’re seeing movement in each one of the areas.”

Punj Lloyd fell 2.4 percent to 46.8 rupees at the close of trading in Mumbai yesterday. The stock has dropped 34 percent in the past year compared with a 30 percent fall in the BSE India Capital Goods Index.

The builder renegotiated contracts for four projects after the new Libyan regime took over, Punj said. On some of the contracts, the company agreed to cut the royalty fee it receives from local partners by half to 1 percent, he said.

Punj Lloyd may not be able to revive all its projects in Libya. The company is no longer counting another $1 billion of orders won in the country by its Singapore-based unit Sembawang Engineers & Constructors Pte. because of lack of progress.

Middle East, Africa

Other Indian construction companies are also expanding in Middle East and Africa as demand slows in their domestic market. Larsen & Toubro Ltd. (LT), the nation’s biggest builder of power plants and airports, last year won a $269 million contract from Qatar General Electricity & Water Corp.

The Mumbai-based company aims to double overseas orders in three years. India’s economy expanded at the weakest pace in nine years in the quarter ended in March. Companies have delayed new investments and expansion plans as a paralysis in policy making and a faltering global recovery damp confidence.

Fitch Ratings and Standard & Poor’s have said they may strip the nation of its investment-grade rating.

Adani Power Ltd. (ADANI) and other electricity generators have delayed building $36 billion of power stations in the country because of concerns about coal supply. Plans by Posco, the world’s third-largest steelmaker, to build a $12 billion steel mill have languished since 2005 for want of environmental clearances and issues over land acquisition.

‘Location Agnostic’

Punj inherited a construction unit with $2 million revenue and debt of more than $3 million when his family business was split in 1989. The company posted a profit of 1.1 billion rupees ($19.3 million) in the year ended in March after three straight annual losses, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Overseas sales accounted for 65 percent of sales in the previous year.

The company’s profit may increase 54 percent in the year ending March 31, 2014 after remaining unchanged in the current fiscal year as it boosts overseas focus, according to a median estimate of 15 analysts compiled by Bloomberg. Punj Lloyd had an orderbook of 273 billion rupees as of March.

“There’s no real major activity happening at this point in time in India,” Punj said. The company’s strategy is to be “location agnostic and go after interesting opportunities anywhere in the world.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Karthikeyan Sundaram in New Delhi at kmeenakshisu@bloomberg.net

[source: Bloomberg]
Comments:

Dear Sir, Greetings from Al Manzel International. As a leading company dealing with recruitment of Pakistani staff Al Manzel International Pakistan provides professional manpower to the Construction, Oilfield, hospitality & Power plants industry. One of our main policies is not to charge recruiting fees and air ticket charges from the companies. We can guarantee to provide you with the best screened recruits as we selected through two rounds of per-interview by our company, before the selection by foreign company. As a leading company dealing with recruitment of Pakistani staff we are looking companies in Libyan market and encourage you to contact us, please feel free to contact us Best Regards with Respect, Azam Khan Managing Director Mob: +971-50-7613855 Abu Dhabi United Arab Emirates U.A.E. Al Manzel International (OEP) Overseas Employment Promoters PAKISTAN Tel: +92-62-2443847 Fax: +92-62-2441847 Mob: +92-342 7380847 (PAK) E mails: azam@almanzelint.com URL: www.almanzelint.com YOU THINK WE MAKE POSSIBLE

Anonymous
5 yearss ago

Business News

Business News
Released:  28/06/20122012-06-28
Word count:  309

Egyptian firms are eyeing the plentiful opportunities in the emerging Libyan market in various business sectors.

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Mina Monir
Companies from Egyptian public and private sectors have expressed their interest in investing and operating in the Libyan rebuilding process. In a series of meetings between representatives of the two neighbouring countries, Libya welcomed giving large scale projects to Egyptian firms to implement in Libya. After the successful contracts of Orsacom Construction and el-Sewedy Cables, Egyptian and Libyan delegations met to further extend their business cooperation.

The main meeting was assembled in the Libyan city Benghazi during the second round of the ArabTurkish Industrial Cooperation conference. The Egyptian delegation included a group of parliament members as well as businessmen. The head of the Egyptian Businessmen Committee, Hussain Abdul Sabour, stated that Egypt has strong capabilities for cooperating with Libyan companies in infrastructure projects and particularly employing Egyptian experience in rebuilding hospitals and roads.

Yet, the more promising field of cooperation will be the construction of electrical energy stations working on renewable energy sources. This will be on the agenda of the third round of the conference that will be held in Cairo in 2013. The Egyptian organizers of the conference have raised recommendations to the Arab Organization for Industrial Development to act as interlocutor between Arab and Turkish companies to establish commercial and industrial zones in Libya. The coming conference will also discuss the possibilities of cooperation between the neighbouring countries of Egypt, Tunisia and Sudan to support small and medium size projects in Libya.

The deputy of the executive head of the Public Firm of Oil in Egypt, Tarek al-Mulla, has delivered different studies to Libya that demomstrate the Egyptian experience in the oil industry and setting out the possibilities for cooperation in that sector.

The deputy of the Egyptian Minister of Commerce in Tripoli Mr. Abdullah al-Wazir stated that Egypt’s exports to Libya reached $530 million in the last year, while Libyan exports to Egypt has reached $60 million.
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Business News

Business News
Released:  28/06/20122012-06-28
Word count:  392

The Dubai Chamber of Commerce and Industry will lead a trade mission to Libya before year-end to assess investment opportunities, a senior Dubai Chamber official has said.

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Zaher Bitar - Gulf News
Speaking to Gulf News on the sidelines of the Libya Development Forum, Atiq Juma Naseeb, senior director of Commercial Services Sector at the Dubai Chamber, said: “Libya has strong potential for our members and the mission would serve as a platform to acquaint Dubai business professionals with the Libyan market.” The delegate is made up of Dubai prominent businessmen and SME operators from different sectors, he said. “The dramatic change in Libya marks a new era and the chance for foreign partners to assist in the rebuilding of a nation is required. Thus, Dubai is looking to drive investment in the country and aid our local businesses in penetrating and showcasing their products and expertise to their target markets.”

Officials from the UAE, and Dubai in particular, have made several instructive visits to Libya to examine how they can play an active role in the country’s development vision. “As banking, construction, tourism and telecommunication are presenting major opportunities for investment, Dubai is well placed to assist since it has significant expertise in these sectors,” he said. “One major opportunity for trade is going to come from Libya’s reconstruction efforts, with demand for rebar, cement, wood, iron and steel as well as technical expertise set to increase. Dubai has a strong industrial manufacturing base and excellent export and logistics facilities, so is ideal to meeting this increased need.” Trade volume “One area of investment that has significant potential and which Dubai has a major advantage is trade. Dubai’s trade with Libya has increased steadily since an end to international sanctions in 2005. Then Dubai’s exports to Libya valued Dh2.8 billion and imports Dh0.3 billion, but moving forward to 2010, Dubai’s exports [stood at] Dh3.5 billion and imports [at] Dh4.1 billion. “ Last year, Dubai’s non-oil trade with Libya reached Dh2.13 billion between January and October — a slight decline due to the impact of political unrest. However, Naseeb added that the unrest had not proved to be as damaging as first anticipated. “Dubai’s main imports from Libya are precious stones, which account for almost 96 per cent of the total. Meanwhile, Dubai’s exports are much more diversified, with electrical equipment, machinery and vehicles making up around 70 per cent and the remaining 30 per cent made up with categories that account for less than 2 per cent each,” he said. [source: Gulf News]
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Construction News

Construction News
Released:  28/06/20122012-06-28
Word count:  330

MINISTRY OF PLANNING LIBYA (Consultancy Services for) (The Review, Evaluate, Prioritize Existing Contracts/Projects) REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

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Hind Bensari
This Request for Expression of Interest (EOI) is the first procurement notice issued by the Ministry of Planning, Government of Libya under the above cited consultancy services.

The services include the review of existing contracts/projects suspended/stopped in various phases after the 17 February Revolution. The projects are part of the 2008-2012 development programs. The projects cover various sectors and activities such as Housing, Infrastructure, Health, Transport, Air Ports, Office Building and similar construction undertakings. These projects are situated nearly in all parts of Libya. The average value of these contracts is around 100 million USD each. The consulting firms are expected to advice the Libyan Government to decide on how and which projects/contracts to be re-activated. The services may include but not limited to the following aspects:

· Financial and commercial evaluation of contracts

· Technical and financial due diligence

· Assess financial requirements for project completions and implementation programs

· Value Engineering

· Re-base lining

· Confirm findings and Assessments through site visits

The Ministry of Planning now invites consulting firms to indicate their interest in providing the services. Interested firms must provide a statement of capability and experience indicating their best area of expertise (housing, infrastructure, hospitals, ports, airports, railways, etc.) that they are qualified to perform the services (brochures, description of similar assignments, experience in similar conditions, availability of appropriate skills among staff, etc.). This advertisement is open to all qualified consulting firms active in the international market.

A short list of six firms will be compiled for each sector. The Request for Proposals (RFP) documents will be available after Saturday 30 June 2012 at the address indicated below. The RFP will be based on the FIDIC white book.

Written expressions of interest must be delivered to the address below by 14:00 (local time) on Monday 25 June, (deadline now extended to 5 July 2012).

If you are interested in this bid, please register to LibyaBusiness TV and post a comment or send an email to hind@libyabusiness.tv expressing your interest to receive the MoP contact details.
Comments:

Hello Richard, please send me an email at hind@libyabusiness.tv with your company and contact details and I will send you all the required information

Anonymous
5 yearss ago

please keep me informed of all developments in this report and the best point of contact at the Ministry of Planning as our Company in Libya is able to provide all these services. thank you

Richard Giddings
5 yearss ago

Business News

Business News
Released:  27/06/20122012-06-27
Word count:  235

The UAE Ambassador to Libya Sa’eed al-Kaby received the Libyan Minister of Oil Abdul-Rahman bin Yazza to discuss supporting economic relations between the two countries.

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Mina Monir
The Libyan Minister of Oil discussed with the UAE ambassador the possible developments in their cooperation in the field of oil and gas, in the light of the agreements signed by the two Arab countries. Mr. bin Yazza praised the strong cooperation between UAE and Libya in the field of energy and the distinguished relations between the two countries. He also expressed the strong will of his country to enhance these relations in the future.

Mr. al-Kaby expressed his country’s desire to promote Libya’s emerging markets after the revolution, which is believed to comply with their common interests. Al-Kaby was appointed as the new ambassador of UAE to Libya in May of this year 2012 in the midst of some difficulties that faced the Emirati business community in Libya and especially in the oil sector. The newly appointed ambassador was commissioned to sustain UAE business interests in Libya and he supported different UAE firms that operate in the country. One of the most vital roles was to pave the way for engineering firms to support and improve oil refineries in Libya as well as helping infrastructure building companies such as ARABTEC to operate in Libya.

"Libya is a medium-term market for us on the residential side, but immediate for oil and gas. Our subsidiary Target Engineering is already looking at some projects in the sector," the company's chief financial officer Ziad Makhzoumi told Reuters.
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Business News

Business News
Released:  27/06/20122012-06-27
Word count:  342

The American Embassy will be actively exploring the possibility of joint arrangements between US and Maltese firms on projects in Libya, including the rebuilding of Libya’s infrastructure and the oil industry.

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Mina Monir
US Ambassador to Malta Gina K Abercrombie-Winstanley gave this welcoming news at a meeting organised by the AmCham Malta at the Malta Chamber of Commerce, Enterprise and Industry entitled: ‘Networking event on Malta: A geostrategic partner for U.S. companies to trade in North Africa?’

Ms Abercrombie-Winstanley said Malta has always been a location of interest of US business. According to 2011 statistics the US is the largest trading partner outside the European Union and accounts for 4.3% of Malta’s total trade. Nowadays one of every 30 jobs in Malta are linked to a US business.

The US Ambassador went on to say that Malta has several unique advantages to offer to US companies interested in trading in North Africa. These include a well-educated, English speaking workforce and Malta’s membership in the EU that automatically gives American companies a foothold for their goods and services to other EU member states.

She added that Malta provides a stable base for projects and investments in Libya. Thus its long relationships with all levels of Libyan business and society should make Malta a very attractive proposition to US entrepreneurs wishing to do business in Libya.

Ms Abercrombie-Winstanley cautioned that until results of elections are known in Libya it would be difficult to gauge Libyan interest in particular areas of development or to identify the mechanisms through which contracts can be solicited and awarded. She said that however it is important for both US and Maltese businesses to begin exploring the possibilities now.

Among the members present for the meeting was Mr Tony Guillaumier who said that he had been doing business with Libya for the past 50 years. He advised those present and anyone interested in making business in Libya to be always assisted by a lawyer and not to take things for granted.

Dr Edward D’Alessandro invited the US Ambassador to encourage well established international charities to make use of Malta’s infrastructure in the financial services and other related services to be able to manage the funds collected for charitable purposes. [source: DI-VE news]
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Business News

Business News
Released:  27/06/20122012-06-27
Word count:  1086

All Africa, Tripoli — The devastation left in the wake of the past year's events has seen many unprecedented challenges for Libya's leaders. The causes and effects of conflict on security, leadership, corruption, ethnic divisions and the extractive industries have all been documented in the mainstream press. Much less, however, has been said about the impact on the 'softer' sectors of health, education and social welfare.

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Mina Monir
Pre-revolution health

Prior to last year's events, Libya was often lauded as having the highest Human Development Index (HDI) in Africa. The discovery of oil and natural gas in the late 1950s transformed the country from one of the world's poorest, dependent on foreign aid, into one of the richest in the region. Due to its modest population of approximately 6 million people, Libya was, on a per capita basis - at least on paper - the third richest country in Africa.

Since the discovery of its hydrocarbon wealth, Libya has shown continual progress in health indicators, with its main achievements being near universal coverage in its childhood immunisation programme and its achievement of close to 100% rate of attended births in hospital. According to World Health Organisation (WHO) figures, Libya also leads the way in having the highest number of hospital beds per capita in the region.

All that glitters is not gold...

For all of these achievements, the truth of Libya's healthcare situation requires a closer analysis. Increasing globalisation, education and the realisation of broad public health interventions (such as safe drinking water and sanitation) are the main contributors to the aforementioned achievements. However, while looking at health indicators over the past 10 to 15 years, quite a different picture of the state of Libya's healthcare emerges.

One of the most significant public health issues in Libya is road traffic accidents. This has seen mortality figures double over the past 15 years and is currently the third highest cause of death in Libya, leaving many more with permanent disability.

Furthermore, on closer inspection of hospital bed figures it emerges that a significant number of hospitals have undergone long periods of construction or renovation, some lasting as long as eight or nine years, while others remain incomplete (as is the case in Misrata and Sebha), meaning that many of these beds are not actually in use or are of poor quality.

Whilst all Libyan citizens have enjoyed an all-encompassing healthcare package that was technically free at the point of use, there has been concern about the quality of services provided. This, coupled with a widespread distrust of public facilities, has meant that a multi-million dollar medical tourism industry has emerged in neighbouring countries solely to cater for Libyan patients. Accordingly, the real rate of expenditure on healthcare is likely to be significantly higher than those stated in official government figures of 12% - the World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates the figure to be closer to 20%.

Emblematic of the poor management and allocation of resources was the procurement by the Libyan Ministry of Health some years ago of a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner - a medical research and diagnostic tool used mainly in the field of oncology. The grand opening for the multi-million dollar PET scanner was broadcast on Libyan state television to much fanfare but since that day, the PET scanner has remained locked in a room unused due to a lack of technical expertise to operate the machine.

Prior to the start of the uprising against Muammar Gaddafi in February 2011, Libya was already struggling to define a clear strategy in the health sector and the events of the Libyan uprising have further confounded these efforts.

Looking for leadership

Libya's new Ministry of Health has sought the help of WHO in order to revitalise the country's "shattered health system" but the country's unstable political climate has made substantive progress difficult and slow.

The revolution took a heavy toll on Libya's people. Although there are no accurate figures for the numbers of people killed, missing or injured, estimates are usually in the tens of thousands. Many patients (either individually on their own expense or through various initiatives under local and national authorities) were sent abroad for treatment. The processes for sending patients abroad were far from transparent and widely abused with many Libyans demanding to be sent abroad for treatments that were not necessarily war-related. In January 2012, Libyan deputy prime minister Mustafa Abushagur estimated that $800 million had been spent on this scheme, of which only 15% was actually used by patients who had war-related injuries.

Many hospital directors and senior government figures have been relieved of their duties to make way for candidates deemed more acceptable to the public in a process similar, though not nearly on the same scale as, the de-ba'athification process which occurred in post-2003 Iraq.

As a result, candidates that lack experience and expertise but are deemed to be more acceptable politically are being propelled into leadership positions. Many of these new candidates have achieved revolutionary legitimacy through their actions during the uprising or have been noted for their opposition to the Gaddafi regime whilst in exile.

Furthermore, the Ministry of Health's attempts to articulate their policies have been poor as they do not reference any actual policies, preferring instead to tout immeasurable goals such as the "development of all parts of the health system and development of health administration".

Where do we go now?

A phased approach to rebuilding the capacity of Libya's public health structures will require technical expertise from international bodies such as the WHO. The already parlous state of human resources in Libya's health sector (particularly in the areas of health policy, administration and finance) has been exacerbated by constant changes and reshuffles at the ministerial and senior civil service levels.

There is no silver bullet that will solve the Libyan health system's bureaucratic and management challenges. The best way forward is a holistic, pragmatic and evidence-based approach. To do this, the Ministry of Health first needs to assess the state of Libya's current healthcare system by conducting a comprehensive Coordinated Needs Assessment. This will allow elected policymakers to make strategic medium and long-term evidence based policy decisions.

Impending elections provide a fresh starting point for an administration to begin, not selected due to 'revolutionary legitimacy', but based on their technocratic ability to deliver results in an already beleaguered and struggling sector.

There are many of challenges facing the Libyan healthcare system after such a devastating conflict. However, the current situation represents an unprecedented opportunity to redefine the basis of the entire system. With its strategic location, temperate climate and strong fiscal position, there is no reason why the current trend of medical tourism to Libya's neighbours should not be reversed. And, with the right policies and adequate technical and financial support, Libya should aspire to being a major healthcare destination itself.

Moez Zeiton is Director for Health Research at the Sadeq Institute, a non-profit, non-governmental think tank based in Libya.

[source: All Africa]
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Construction News

Construction News
Released:  26/06/20122012-06-26
Word count:  191

The Libyan Minister of Planning Eissa al-Twaijery stated that the Libyan government has discussed the requirementsto establish big projects on Libyan soil.

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Mina Monir
During the cabinet meetings, projects in the sectors of transportation, aviation, train lines, highways and underground subways were discussed to determine the costs and periods of the executing these projects. “The Libyan government is committed to implement contracts worth tens of billions of dollars and it is expected that these projects will be carried on in all corners of Libya with total cost that might reach $18 billion as well as the first stage of underground subway that costs $4 billion” al-Twaijery said in statements given to al-Sharq al-Awsat news agency. “Contracts have been signed with Chinese companies for building railway lines as well as Russian firms, these are under evaluation with respect to the role of Libyan companies in these projects”, he added. Mr. al-Twaijery stated that the sources of funding for these projects will be determined according to available Libyan financial capacities. Al-Tawaijery underscored the will to discuss the Libyan budget in a scientific way that could provide the Libyan infrastructure needs for the coming 15 years. He also indicated that the Libyan transportation projects are prioritised despite their high cost that is believed to reach a scale of billions of dollars.
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Political News

Political News
Released:  26/06/20122012-06-26
Word count:  994

The release by NATO of a list of unexploded munitions from the alliance’s military action in Libya has been both welcomed as a step toward postconflict accountability and criticized as a half-measure that falls short of protecting civilians and specialists trying to rid the country of its hazards.

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The United Nations said this month that NATO, in an exchange not publicly disclosed, had shared details of 313 possible sites of unexploded ordnance from the alliance’s action against Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s government last year. The alliance provided the latitude and longitude for each site, the weight of the ordnance and a description of the means of delivery (fixed-wing aircraft, helicopter gunship or naval vessel).

With the widespread use of sophisticated targeting sensors, with which aircrews record infrared video of the impact of a missile or bomb, air forces have a greater capacity than ever to know exactly where weapons struck and when they have failed to function properly. Such data is routinely gathered as part of what militaries call battle damage assessment. It is used to determine whether a target has been destroyed or should be hit again, and to assess the reliability and effectiveness of various missiles and bombs.

The data also presents options for humanitarian and cleanup efforts. When shared, it can allow for governments and mine-clearing organizations to alert residents of specific risks at specific places, and to focus efforts on removing high-explosive remnants of war. Its existence also suggests an opening for Western militaries to adopt a new standard for responsibility in air campaigns.

For these reasons, the United Nations, which had asked NATO for the data last year, welcomed the list, even though it contained limited information.

“It is helpful, because at least we know where these are,” said Max Dyck, program manager for the United Nations Mine Action Service in Libya. “We’re not waiting for someone to call up and say, ‘Hey, I have this great big dirty something in my garden.’ ”

Without such data, weapons containing volatile explosives and, in some cases, toxic propellants stand to be found randomly or in drawn-out surveys, raising the risk of accidental discovery — and detonation — by rubble-clearance crews, farmers’ plows, children or anyone else.

But the data has also been a source of disappointment and irritation, because NATO provided no information about the types of unexploded weapons, or the fuzes used to arm each missile or bomb.

This information, along with what are known as “render-safe procedures” for each type of weapon, is considered essential by ordnance-clearance teams. It is routinely recorded by modern military forces, via so-called bomb-build sheets, in which each component of a weapon is documented as a weapon is armed and prepared for an aircraft.

Colin King, a former British Army bomb disposal officer and an analyst for IHS Jane’s, said he could see no reason for NATO to withhold ordnance-specific details. “If the damn thing didn’t go off, why wouldn’t you share what it was?” he asked. “People are going to find it anyway. It’s going to be lying on the ground, and it might cost someone their life.”

“It is irresponsible,” Mr. King added. “You are not going to give away much in the way of vital intelligence by saying what it was.”

NATO, which said that it “has contributed to the timely removal of these munitions and therefore to the improvement of security for the Libyan people,” declined to answer why the types of weapons and render-safe procedures were not provided. “We do not comment on technical operational details,” Oana Lungescu, the alliance’s spokeswoman, said by e-mail.

NATO has said that its air campaign over Libya resulted in the release of 7,700 missiles or bombs. Almost all of the suspected duds — 303 — that NATO acknowledged were released from warplanes. Six were from helicopters, and four from warships.

The NATO campaign appears not to have involved potentially harmful radioactivity or cluster munitions, which scatter small bombs or mines that typically have high dud rates and are prone to exploding when disturbed.

In an e-mail late last year, Col. Gregory Julian, a United States Army officer serving as an alliance spokesman, said NATO and its partners had not used cluster or depleted uranium rounds in Libya. He also said NATO had not used free-falling “dumb bombs.” All of its airstrikes in Libya, he said, were made with guided missiles and bombs.

The NATO release was the latest development in what mine-clearance teams describe as a slowly evolving process of Western combatants’ sharing airstrike information with nonmilitary ordnance-disposal technicians.

In the 1990s, the United States released extensive data on its bombing of Laos during the Vietnam War, after years of resisting requests from Mines Advisory Group, a nonprofit ordnance-clearance organization in Britain.

The information, made public decades after American pilots carried out the secret bombing campaign, has since been used in a detailed mapping project, as an advocacy tool, and to help with the cleanup of the remnants of a little-covered military action carried out on a vast scale.

After the Kosovo war ended in 1999, NATO released geographic information on its airstrikes there, though mine-clearers said the value of that release was undermined by the inaccuracy of much of the data. (In that case, Mr. King and Sean Sutton, a spokesman for Mines Advisory Group, said ordnance teams went to many sites NATO had said it struck and found nothing, and found areas that had been hit with cluster munitions that NATO had not disclosed.)

The United States military has also provided nonmilitary ordnance-clearance teams limited information about airstrikes in Iraq.

The data release on Libya contained one new element: This was the first time a military force shared dud-specific locations for a campaign, according to Mr. King. In the past, he said, militaries described locations of airstrikes generally, and they did not differentiate between ordnance known to have exploded and ordnance suspected of having failed.

Mr. Sutton said he hoped that combatants in other conflicts would release similar data, but that more information would be included. “Amongst the mine-action actors, obviously we have no political interest in this,” Mr. Sutton said. “It is simply a matter of how quickly and safely we can do our jobs.”

[Source: New York Times]
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Business News

Business News
Released:  25/06/20122012-06-25
Word count:  192

Libya will hire a local firm to help process financial claims filed by Jordanian hospitals that have treated around 55,000 Libyan patients over the past year, a Libyan official said on Saturday.

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Following a meeting with Private Hospitals Association President Fawzi Hammouri, Libyan Health Bureau Director Ali Bin Jalil said that a deal would be concluded with a Jordanian medical insurance management company to process all bills, which would be paid when the audit was completed and the money allocated by the Libyan government arrives.

The delay in payment has led to a dispute between the Jordanian providers and Libyan authorities.

Jordanian hospitals and hotels are reportedly owed around $200 million by Tripoli in bills accumulated over months of treating and accommodating tens of thousands of Libyans who arrived in the Kingdom in the aftermath of last year’s revolution that ousted Muammar Qadhafi from power.

The Jordan News Agency, Petra, quoted Hammouri and Bin Jalil as highlighting the importance of maintaining good relations between the two countries and working on creating an environment for cooperation between Jordanian private hospitals and the Libyan health sector in the long run.

Hammouri stressed the importance of processing the bills as soon as possible so they can be paid within a 30-day deadline after auditing is completed as stipulated in the Libyan-Jordanian Medical Cooperation Protocol.

[source: Al-Bawaba Business]
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Oil & Gas News

Oil & Gas News
Released:  25/06/20122012-06-25

Libya, a member of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), holds the largest proven oil reserves in Africa.

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Mina Monir
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Political News

Political News
Released:  25/06/20122012-06-25
Word count:  448

Libyan and Italian authorities are achieving progress in building relations between the two countries on different levels, including in business, legal and financial sectors.

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Mina Monir
For geographical and cultural reasons, Libya and Italy enjoy a distinguished relationship. After Libya’s revolution to overthrow Gaddafi’s regime, Italy cooperated with Libya in the rebuilding process and Tripoli considers itself as a strategic partner with Rome in cross cultural and political issues concerning their two continents. One of the most controversial issues is the illegal emigration from African countries, via the Libyan shores to Italy, which is the southern gate of Europe. Tripoli and Rome are addressing the problem with an agreement known as the Declaration of Tripoli, which concerns the situation of refugees, migrants and asylum seekers is governed according to human rights and legal regulations.

Amnesty International has called on the Italian authorities to reconsider the Tripoli Declaration, but the Italian foreign Minister Guilio Terzi has defended its migration control system. Terzi has insisted that the accords “comply with international conventions” and “are based on respect for human dignity”.

“I believe that the basic point is the Declaration of Tripoli, in which the NTC undertook along with the Italian government to comply with all existing international conventions concerning human rights, the rights of migrants, the conditions regarding human dignity and the dignity of the individual and this is the basic architecture on which all pre-existing accords were based and which will guide future technical stipulations”, the minister added.

Economic relations have witnessed progress in both the financial and business sectors. The Italian business mission that visited Libya to discuss different business opportunities in Tripoli and Benghazi has arrived back in Rome with positive feedback. Dr. Luca Bargilli, the CEO of SIS&I, expressed great satisfaction with the large participation in the meetings at the Ishbelia Hotel. Almost 100 Libyan companies took part and that resulted in the setting up of new commercial initiatives between the two sides.

The main activities, with 25 percent, were related to the constructions sector. 15 per cent of the participants came from the food sector, and another 15 per cent from consultancy. Other participating companies ranged from those active in agriculture, chemistry, furniture, fishing, waste treatment, information technology and medicine. It is expected that the Italian energy companies as well as construction experts will play a vital role in the next stages of the rebuilding process in Libya while Libyan businesses will revive again in the Italian business market. Consequently, the Libyan Investment Authority has also sent a delegation to Italy.

In a further significant step, over a year after the Libyan revolution, the financial branch of Tripoli's government is in Italy for the hearing on July 12 at the Appeals Court in Rome. This case could see the release of 1.1 billion Euros of goods and assets frozen by the magistrates last March.
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News Releases

News Releases Business News

Charles Gurdon, Managing Director, Menas Associates gives his opinion of the political and economical situation in LIbya at the recent City & Financial Conference entitled "Winning Business in Libya: A Practical Guide for UK Companies" on 14 May 2012

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